Active Shooter Response

 

An Active Shooter is an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area; in most cases, active shooters use firearm(s) and there is no pattern or method to their selection of victims. Active shooter situations are unpredictable and evolve quickly. Typically, the immediate deployment of law enforcement is required to stop the shooting and mitigate harm to victims.  Because active shooter situations are often over within 10 to 15 minutes, before law enforcement arrives on the scene, individuals must be prepared both mentally and physically to deal with an active shooter situation.  Good practices for coping with an active shooter situation:

 

  • Be aware of your environment and any possible dangers
  • Take note of the two nearest exits in any facility you visit
  • If you are in an office, stay there and secure the door
  • If you are in a hallway, get into a room and secure the door
  • As a last resort, attempt to take the active shooter down.  When the shooter is at close range and you cannot flee, your chance of survival is much greater if you try to incapacitate him/her.
  • Call 911 when it is safe to do so!

 

In addition to these helpful tips, SCN has provided key resources in this section for enhancing safety and security during active shooter scenarios. Please review the resources below or click on the links provided on the right-hand side of the page.

  • Run, Hide, Fight: Surviving an Active Shooter Event

    City of Houston, TX. Following the July 21, 2012, mass casualty shooting in Aurora, Colorado, the City of Houston has released an instructional video on what to do in case of a similar emergency. Funded by the Department of Homeland Security, the city hopes that the video can help people prepare people for the worst. Entitled Run. Hide. Fight. Surviving an Active Shooter Event, it depicts a fictional shooting incident in a crowded office building.

  • Active Shooter: How To Respond Booklet

    The DHS Active Shooter: How To Respond Booklet provides the profile of an active shooter scenario. The Booklet outlines the Run, Hide and Fight response options when engaged in active shooter scenarios, and reviews how to respond when law enforcement personnel arrives. This booklet provides information for training staff members on active shooter situations and gives tips for recognizing workplace violence.

  • Active Shooter Event Quick Reference Guide

    This pamphlet provides a concise review of how to respond during active shooter events. The pamphlet reviews what to do when law enforcement arrives, information that should be reported to 911 operations, and how to protect yourself during an active shooter scenario.

  • Active Shooter Poster

    This poster provides quick tips for responding to active shooter scenarios, including how to act and respond to law enforcement during active shooter situations and how to recognize workplace violence.

  • Recognizing the 8 Signs of Terrorism

    The Colorado Information Analysis Center provides this educational video to review eight indicators of terrorists plotting activity against your facility, including surveillance, elicitation, tests of security, funding, acquiring supplies, impersonation, rehearsal, deployment. The video reminds viewers to report suspicious activity to law enforcement entities immediately.

  • CERT Training: Handling Mass Casualty Situations

    Medical triage is the key to doing the most good for the most people whenever there are more victims than rescuers, resources are limited, and time is critical. This training video provides an overview of the medical triage process and portrays the steps that CERT members need to follow to provide victims the most effective lifesaving support available until professional responders arrive on scene.

  • CERT Train-the-Trainer: Victim Extrications

    Lt. Gregg Karl of the Arlington County, Virginia, Fire Department walks a group of CERT trainees through a cribbing and leveraging exercise. This video is recommended for use in the CERT Train-the-Trainer course to demonstrate effective instructional techniques for teaching victim extrication.

  • CERT Train-the-Trainer: Demonstrating Victim Carries

    Lt. Gregg Karl of the Arlington County, Virginia, Fire Department demonstrates three different types of victim carries to a class of CERT trainees. This video is recommended for use in the CERT Train-the-Trainer course to demonstrate effective instructional techniques for teaching victim carries.

  • CERT Train-the-Trainer: Demonstrating Head-to-Toe Assessment

    Lt. Byron Dixon of the Arlington County, Virginia, Fire Department demonstrates a head-to-toe assessment for a class of CERT trainees. This video is recommended for use in the CERT Train-the-Trainer course to demonstrate effective instructional techniques for teaching head-to-toe assessments.

  • Surveillance Detection Guidelines

    The information in this document provides an overview of countersurveillance. It outlines the three forms of countersurveillance: Fixed Surveillance, Foot Surveillance, and Vehicle Surveillance. Also listed in this document are indicators of surveillance being conducted against your facility and indicators of suspicious behavior.

  • Report Suspicious Behavior and Activity

    The Department of Homeland Security poster gives viewers helpful tips to increase cognizance of suspicious behavior and activity. It can be used as a reminder for staff members and visitors located at facilities to be vigilant of suspicious behavior and report it to law enforcement.

  • FBI-DHS Private Sector Advisory

    This poster warns that businesses can become unwitting participants in illicit or terrorist activities. It encourages employees to be aware of suspicious purchases or suspicious usage of the business's products and services. It provides three steps to track unusual activity at facilities.

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